Random theory

“Some panels and pages [of some erotic comics, like the work of Molly Kiely and Colleen Coover] unfold like snapshots, gesturing at a larger hole that is unrepresented and perhaps unrepresentable.”    -Lyndsay Brown, ‘Pornographic space-time and the potential of fantasy in comics and fan art’

My own question, then, isn’t whether unrepresentability is possible in the ways we communicate our narratives–especially our fictions–but how.

Deleted Scenes

A footnote and accompanying media cut from the following, which is, itself, part of an upcoming piece on the Marvel Omniverse:

…if superhero film narratives are inspired by superhero comic narratives, the whole #itsallconnected ethos only adds the complication of replacing ageing human actors to the problematics of multiversal/time-travelling/title-hopping/otherwise-conveniently-present characters interacting with themselves, others, themselves-as-others, and others-as-themselves.[1]


[1] A little tangentially: I still don’t get how Logan St. Claire is supposed to be a version of Quinn Mallory.  Gender-swap, fine, but why would they have different last names if they’re ‘genetically identical’???  WTF???

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Also some bullshit.  DROP ZIGGY, YOU FRAUD!!!

Random Theory

Ce ne sont pas Mark Gruenwald

Mark Greunwald (1953-1996) was a writer and editor of numerous Marvel titles, including Captain America, What If?, and most relevantly here, a number of editions of The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe.

Mark Greunwald is the [psychoanalytic figure of] The Father of the Marvel Universe.

Grueny: Keepin’ it firmly away from The Real since at least ’78.

 
cest-le-darkhold

 

 

Random Theory

Another attempt to summarize my perspective that will only seem inaccurate later:

At this point, it’s seeming as though the only notable difference between narrative and linguistic subjects (fictional characters and real people) is one of physicality in this linguistic, physical realm (lacanian ‘reality’): we linguistic subjects have bodies, narrative subjects don’t and may or may not ever. But, in discourse–communication via representations that pretty much constitutes all media by definition–physicality is what’s precisely not needed, worked around, obviated. So, the distinction between the subject who has a body and the one who doesn’t, at least in how they’re treated, how their identities are socially understood, how they are defined in discourse, doesn’t amount to much.

Especially since we’re also getting around the lack of fictional bodies by making our fictions more realistically interactive in various ways, such as gaming, VR cinema, and even ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ YouTube series.

Random Theory

Pilcher could have made Wayward Pines into a Hegelian utopia of mutual, face-to-face recognition and valuation if only he’d had better PR and solid personnel and materials managers. A few ‘You Are Valued’ posters, a suggestions box, and 1st Amendment rights would’ve been a good start. 

Random Theory

McLean Stevenson

Or, I don’t know… not?

Would it be fair to characterize M*A*S*H as the story of the death of Henry Blake and its aftermath among those he served with?  A kind of bildungsroman that extends past the actual presence of the protagonist whose life–and the effects of that life–it follows?

I might write more on this.

Cross-Promotion: Rogue’s Gallery pilot!

Rogues Gallery ep 1 - FB icon - tricked outSo,  probably as a result of all the academic work I’m doing in comics and narrative and media, I’ve developed a first episode for what might just be a series of scripts, but might also become anything from a radio play to a YouTube series (a boy can always dream)!  The source material isn’t strictly out of copyright, so all due recognition to DC Comics and Columbia Pictures.

Take a look at the script and feel free to leave comments right in the doc (ctrl+m): https://goo.gl/OVHiOi

Or, leave a comment on the project’s Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/aroguesgallery
Thanks readers!